Theatre diverts all its waste from landfill sites

Theatre Royal manager Chantelle Nolan and Thomas Aspinall of B&M Waste Services
Theatre Royal manager Chantelle Nolan and Thomas Aspinall of B&M Waste Services
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A theatre in St Helens has introduced a new service which allows none of its waste to be taken to landfill sites.

St Helens Theatre Royal, in partnership with B&M Waste Services, diverted all its rubbish to recycling centres.

Since the partnership began in February 2017, the theatre has benefited from a Carbon Neutral waste management service with zero waste being sent to landfill.

Theatre manager Chantelle Nolan said: “We have been so happy with the service provided by B&M and it is great to know that we have a sustainable waste strategy in place.”

Prior to working with B&M the popular and long-established venue utilised a man in van collection for all waste, which was not segregated.

B&M provided an in depth waste audit and put forward a proposal that was tailored to the theatre’s requirements and relevant to the actual type and volumes of waste generated.

It was determined that the most efficient solution was to segregate three waste streams – general waste, cardboard, and glass.

General waste is brought back to B&M’s Material Recovery Facility (MRF) in Bromborough, Wirral. Additional recyclate is removed at the MRF while the residual general waste is recovered for energy use as Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF). The segregated paper, cardboard and glass waste is 100 per cent recycled.

Thomas Aspinall, area sales manager at B&M, said: “St Helens Theatre Royal is a fantastic venue. Implementing the new system was seamless and the environmental benefits are clear for all to see.”

In the first year of the contract, over seven tonnes of the theatre’s glass waste has been recycled, along with over five tonnes of paper, cardboard and other recyclables, with 10 tonnes of general waste converted to energy.

The theatre has saved around 10,000kg of carbon emissions through landfill diversion, the equivalent of more than eight trees and over 6,000 car miles.