Here's how much council tax you will pay in St Helens if rise approved

Councillors are expected to approve the proposalsto increase council tax by 2.99% for the coming financial year
Councillors are expected to approve the proposalsto increase council tax by 2.99% for the coming financial year
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A council tax rise is set to be rubber stamped by St Helens Council today as the local authority looks to protect “vital services”.

Councillors are expected to approve the council’s revenue and capital budget for 2019-2020, which includes proposals to increase council tax by 2.99% for the coming financial year, at full council.

If approved, the decision will mean that council tax for an average Band D property – the standard measure of council tax – will be set at £1,745.86 – an £87 increase from 2018-19.

This includes a police and crime commissioner precept of £201.97 for Band D properties, which has also seen an increase of £24.

Band D properties will also pay a Merseyside Fire and Rescue Authority precept of £78.84 and a new Liverpool City Region Combined Authority precept of £19.

Residents who live in an area with a parish council will also pay slightly more.

Here is what each council tax band will pay:

Band A properties will pay £1,163.91, an increase of £58.18

Band B properties will pay £1,357.89, an increase of £67.87

Band C properties will pay £1,551.87, an increase of £77.56

Band D properties will pay £1,745.86, an increase of £87.26

Band E properties will pay £2,133.82, an increase of £106.65

Band F properties will pay £2,521.78, an increase of £126.02

Band G properties will pay £2,909.77, an increase of £145.44

Band H properties will pay £3,491.72, an increase of £174.52

St Helens Council set a three-year budget in March 2017 covering the period 2017-2020.

The aim of the budget is to provide resources to deliver the local authority’s statutory responsibilities and to set a foundation for, and facilitate, the delivery of the council’s key ambitions and its existing and emerging corporate priorities and borough level strategic objectives.

Council chiefs said the budget has been formulated against the challenge of “continuing central government-imposed austerity”, requiring the delivery of £20.6m of savings over three years.

The local authority said the council tax rise will provide sustainable income that will protect “vital services” at a time of “reducing central government support and increasing service demands”.