Pair convicted of dog microchipping offences

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Two pet owners from St Helens have been convicted for breaching dog microchipping legislation.

Richard Delnik, 21, formerly of Ravenstone Drive, St Helens was ordered to pay a total of £255 after pleading guilty at Liverpool, Knowsley and St Helens Magistrates’ Court of failing to update the microchip transponder details of his imported Dachshund dog on a British database within the required timescale, as prescribed by the Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations 2015.

elnik also pleaded guilty to an offence of allowing his Dachshund dog into a public place without a collar bearing the name and address of the owner inscribed on the collar, or on a plate or badge attached to it, as prescribed by the Control of Dogs Order 1992.

Delnik was fined £50 for each offence, with costs of £125 and ordered to pay a victim surcharge of £30.

Meanwhile, Ceri Taylor, 37, of Tyrer Road, Newton-le-Willows was ordered to pay a total of £255 after being found guilty in her absence at Liverpool, Knowsley and St Helens Magistrates’ Court of failing to update her dog’s microchip details, as prescribed by the Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations 2015.

The court heard how Taylor’s male Bull Terrier type dog was seized as a stray dog in May this year, and on claiming her dog back from St Helens Council’s Dog Welfare and Enforcement Service, she was served with a notice under section 12 (a) of the Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations 2015, requiring her to have her dog’s microchip details updated within 21 days.

Taylor failed to comply despite being served with a ‘Final Opportunity to Comply’ notice which effectively gives a dog owner an extra seven days to meet the requirements of the legislation.

She was fined £100, with costs of £125 and ordered to pay a victim surcharge of £30.

Coun Terry Shields, cabinet member for Green, Smart and Sustainable Borough, said: “Laws surrounding the ownership of dogs have been set for a reason and we will ensure that they are enforced.

“If dogs are found unregistered to the address at which they live, then an offence has been committed and the owner will be liable for a hefty fine.”