St Helens community has region's worst blood pressure figures

Rainford has the highest blood pressure figures in the North West
Rainford has the highest blood pressure figures in the North West
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A neighbourhood in St Helens has a bigger problem with high blood pressure than any other community in the North West, shock figures reveal.


Rainford had the unwanted honour of topping the regional league table as the health condition affects 21.6 per cent of those living there.

Other news: St Helens Council leader says funding reforms unfair on the town

The data from the House of Commons Public Library shows it is by no means an isolated case as both St Helens constituencies have high blood pressure figures well above regional and national averages.

The rate was 17.7 per cent in St Helens North and 17 per cent in St Helens South and Whiston, compared to 15.2 per cent for Merseyside and Cheshire, 14.5 per cent in the North West and 13.8 per cent for England.

The Commons research also looked at six other health conditions: asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), dementia, depression, diabetes and obesity.

And the figures clearly show the scale of the task facing public health officials as both St Helens constituencies had figures significantly over the regional or national averages for the majority of the conditions.

St Helens South and Whiston has the biggest problem with depression which 14 per cent of constituency residents suffer from, compared to 13.1 per cent in St Helens North.

That, though, is well over the wider averages of 11.6 per cent in the North West, 11.7 per cent in Merseyside and Cheshire and 9.8 per cent in England.

The next-biggest public health problem is obesity, which affects 12.4 per cent of residents in St Helens North and 10.9 per cent in St Helens South and Whiston.

By contrast, the averages are 10.7 for the North West, 11.1 per cent for Merseyside and Cheshire and 9.7 per cent for England.

St Helens South and Whiston also had a slightly bigger issue with dementia, which affects 0.9 per cent of residents compared to 0.8 per cent in St Helens North. The latter is identical to the figures for wider areas.

Asthma affects 7.6 per cent of people in St Helens North and seven per cent in St Helens South and Whiston, while the figures for COPD were 3.1 per cent and three per cent and for diabetes 7.7 per cent and 7.6 per cent respectively.

Only the figures for dementia put either St Helens constituency either level with or lower than the statistics for further afield.

The interactive map of the research also shows where the public health hotspots are within each individual constituency.

For example, the Rainhill South area has the highest rate of depression in St Helens South and Whiston with 15.9 per cent of residents affected, while St Helens North has its biggest problem with obesity in Haydock where 13.9 of residents are seriously overweight.

To see all the statistics visit https://commonslibrary.parliament.uk/social-policy/health/diseases/constituency-data-how-healthy-is-your-area/