Violet-Grace’s parents speak of organ donation decision

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The parents of Violet-Grace Youens, the little girl killed by a hit and run driver, have spoken of their decision to donate her organs.

Glenn and Becky Youens were speaking at the NHS Blood and Transplant donation week being held to promote the importance of organ donation.

Speaking at the Salford Royal Hospital, where Violet-Grace was treated before her death in March this year, Becky said: “The knowledge that Violet lives on in others helps us to grieve and we don’t want anyone else to go through the pain we are.

“The Specialist Nurses have been amazing and have helped us to turn a negative in to a positive. All the specialist nurses – organ donation and surgeons were remarkable.

“They treated Violet as their own child that day and that we will never forget that. They treated our little angel with complete respect and dignity, and not being able to be in the room with her I know they looked after her and she was in good hands.

“After the operation, Violet was bathed and had her hair washed in her own shampoo and conditioner and dressed in her Trolls pyjamas.”

Glenn, Becky and their close friends took part in the hospital’s organ donation games in honour of their little girl, and to raise the importance of organ donation and the need to speak about it. Becky said:

Glenn added: “We took part in honour of Violet, she is our little angel. She donated her kidney and pancreas and we want to keep Violet’s memory alive and the gift she gave to the recipients.

“A lot of people have signed up to organ donation because of Violet and I know one wants to talk about death, but you need to and we are here to help raise awareness and encourage people to have the conversation about organ donation.

“With Violet’s headstone going in this week and being the week she was meant to be starting school, the Donation Games has given us something to focus on, in such a hard and painful week.”

Violet-Grace Youens

Violet-Grace Youens

Ian Trenholm the CEO of NHS Blood and Transplant opened the organ donation event thanking everyone for their attendance and support, and explained why having that one conversation could help save so many people’s lives.

Only one in every hundred people die in circumstances where they could donate, so every potential donor is precious.