‘Now we can start the fight for justice’

Marie Lyon is a campaigner and chairwoman of the Association For Children Damaged By Hormone Pregnancy Testing

Marie Lyon is a campaigner and chairwoman of the Association For Children Damaged By Hormone Pregnancy Testing

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A St Helens woman calling for a public enquiry into why Primodos pills has won a landmark battle after MPs agreed to disclose all documents.

Marie Lyon’s daughter Sarah was born in 1970 missing her arm below the elbow. At the time she was given no explanation but had been given two primodos pills by her GP some eight months earlier.

Marie is now the current chair of The Association for Children Damaged by Hormone Pregnancy Tests - a group made up of parents and children who seek transparency over all issues surrounding Primodos.

She spent last week in Westminster lobbying MPs and, following a debate, the under secretary of state for the Department of Health, George Freeman MP, agreed to the disclosure of all Primodos documents.

Primodos was prescribed to women between 1965 and 1978 despite concerns being raised as early as 1967.

Marie said: “I’m delighted that the MPs have agreed to a full disclosure of the documents as we may finally get some answers.”

The association was originally formed in 1967 by Jack Astley MP but after years of fighting a legal action failed to reach a conclusion on Primodos and the group (which then had around 500 members) folded in 1982.

However, after new evidence came to light the group was reformed in 2009 and Marie was elected chair in 2012.

Marie said: “Since we re-formed we now have 30 new members in the group and many are original members, which is fantastic. Unfortunately we haven’t been able to contact some and, in some cases, the children affected have died.”

Primodos was prescribed by GPs across Britain in the 1960s and 70s to determine whether or not a woman was pregnant.

It is estimated 1.5 million took the drug before it was taken off the market in 1978. Bayer Pharmaceuticals denies the drug was responsible for causing deformities.