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Sundial unveiled in memory of murdered teacher

Murdered teacher Paul Bellion, whose parents live in St Helens, pictured with his fiancee who was also killed in a gangland-style incident in France

Murdered teacher Paul Bellion, whose parents live in St Helens, pictured with his fiancee who was also killed in a gangland-style incident in France

Family and colleagues of a St Helens teacher murdered in mysterious circumstances gathered to unveil a sundial at the school where he worked.

Paul Bellion, who taught craft at Rosemary Musker High School in Norfolk, was found dead in a field in France along with his fiancee Lorraine Glasby in a killing which had hallmarks of a gangland execution in 1986.

His niece Tracey Goddard and former headteacher Geoffrey Lloyd were joined by 14-year-old pupil Connor Sillet to unveil the memorial sundial at the site of the school, which is now part of Thetford Academy.

The case remains unsolved and Ms Goddard, who attended the ceremony with her mum and now lives in Berkshire, said she was pleased to see so many people travel across the country to Norfolk to help keep Paul’s memory alive.

Ms Goddard, 43, said: “It was overwhelming and nice to know his memory lives on. I didn’t realise how many people would be there.

“What happened to Paul and Lorraine was just tragic, and the hardest part is not knowing why, how or what the motive was.

“They were a lovely, happy couple with everything to live for, and it’s just such a shame.”

Paul moved from his native St Helens to Norfolk after his fiancee Lorraine got a job in the nearby town of Diss and the couple liked the area.

He and Lorraine went to France on a cycling holiday but their bodies were found in a Breton maize field around a month after their deaths, tied and gagged with gunshots in the back of the neck.

The headteacher of Rosemary Musker at the time Geoffrey Lloyd, who travelled from Somerset to be at the ceremony, said the tribute, created by Thetford company Warren Services, was particularly appropriate as Paul had taught pupils a major craft and design project on telling the time which involved making sundials.

Mr Lloyd said: “I was very pleased to appoint Paul, he brought a fresh new approach to design teaching. He was a vigorous and effective young teacher who was very much liked by the pupils.

“His approach was based on getting pupils to think through different ideas, produce their own designs and then make them, which is quite commonplace now but was quite inventive at the time.”

No-one has ever been brought to justice for Paul’s death, with French prosecutors finally closing the case in 2006, but Ms Goddard says the family still clings to the hope the case may one day be solved. She said: “I hope someone will come along and confess or they will find DNA or something to link them to it. It will then put the family’s mind at rest and we will have a bit of justice, because we have had none.”

 

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