‘Legacy of weak teaching’ holding back pupils at leading St Helens school

Former acting headteacher at Haydock High School Dee Griffiths pictured in 2014. She previously banned energy drinks and fizzy pop for pupils at the school and has noticed a marked improvement in their behaviour since replacing the energy drinks and fizzy pop with water bottles
Former acting headteacher at Haydock High School Dee Griffiths pictured in 2014. She previously banned energy drinks and fizzy pop for pupils at the school and has noticed a marked improvement in their behaviour since replacing the energy drinks and fizzy pop with water bottles
  • Haydock High requires improvement, say inspectors
  • Previous weak teaching and a narrow curriculum hamper pupils’ chances
  • Staffing turbulence also highlighted in critical report

One of the town’s biggest secondary school has been told it “requires improvement” after a critical Ofsted report.

Haydock High was given the second lowest rating by inspectors from the education watchdog.

The report identified a number of issues, including low outcomes for year 11 pupils and a “legacy of previous weak teaching and a narrow curriculum” at the school.

In 2014 Haydock High made national headline when it banned fizzy drinks from the school grounds.

The report also states that learning is “too variable” and some teachers should raise their expectations of pupils.

Inspectors also cited “staffing turbulence” as adversely affecting learning in maths and science, and criticised the school’s improvement plan, saying it did not include sufficient targets to hold leaders to account.

However, the report did praise school leaders as having a “a good understanding of the school’s strengths and weaknesses”.

Teaching in English, languages and humanities was praised.