Hard-hitting domestic abuse drama performed at town hall

Councillors and the Mayor of St Helens with cast members
Councillors and the Mayor of St Helens with cast members

A ground-breaking drama lifting the lid on the domestic abuse problems children face was performed to a packed audience at St Helens Town Hall.

Award-winning Certain Curtain Theatre Company, renowned for tackling sensitive and controversial subjects, brought Mockingbird High to the town to tell the compelling tale of two students who are left emotionally affected from the problems they witness at home.

The council will continue to work to identify those who are victims of domestic violence and ensure we hold perpetrators to account

Coun Lisa Preston

The play shown to council staff and local agencies as part of St Helens Council’s domestic abuse awareness raising activities following White Ribbon Day at the end of November.

At the end of the show, those in attendance had the opportunity to give their views by filling in a questionnaire which will be used to help shape St Helens Council’s domestic abuse strategy.

Speaking after the event, St Helens Council’s cabinet member for community safety Coun Lisa Preston said: “It was a privilege to be invited to attend the showing of Mockingbird High which is an emotionally powerful portrayal of the damaging impact domestic abuse can have on a child.

“The council, along with our community safety partners, will continue to work to identify those who are victims of domestic violence and strive to ensure we hold perpetrators to account for their actions.”

Residents are encouraged to sign the White Ribbon pledge to vow never to commit, condone or remain silent about domestic violence.

To sign the pledge and for more information about the campaign, visit www.sthelens.gov.uk/whiteribbon

Victims of domestic violence or those concerned about someone they know can call the Independent Domestic Violence Advocate (IDVA) on 01744 743 200,

Anyone concerned their own behaviour is hurting someone can contact the Respect helpline on 0808 802 4040.