Booze-fuelled admissions fall at hospitals

Light drinking 'cuts asthma risk'''Embargoed to 0730 Sunday September 25''PICTURE POSED BY MODELS.'' File photo dated 25/4/2007 of two females drinking wine in a central London pub as moderate alcohol consumption may reduce the risk of asthma, research suggests. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Sunday September 25, 2011. But heavy drinking makes the condition more likely, the Danish study found. Scientists compared alcohol intake with asthma risk over a period of eight years in more than 19,000 twins aged 12 and 41. All participants completed questionnaires at the start and end of the study. Fewer than 4% of those who drank one to six units of alcohol per week developed asthma. In comparison, more than 6% of people who rarely or never drank alcohol began suffering symptoms. Around 4.5% of heavy drinkers who consumed four or more units of alcohol per day became asthmatic. One unit of alcohol is equivalent to half a pint of beer, a single measure of spirits, or just under a standard 125ml glass of wine. See
Light drinking 'cuts asthma risk'''Embargoed to 0730 Sunday September 25''PICTURE POSED BY MODELS.'' File photo dated 25/4/2007 of two females drinking wine in a central London pub as moderate alcohol consumption may reduce the risk of asthma, research suggests. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Sunday September 25, 2011. But heavy drinking makes the condition more likely, the Danish study found. Scientists compared alcohol intake with asthma risk over a period of eight years in more than 19,000 twins aged 12 and 41. All participants completed questionnaires at the start and end of the study. Fewer than 4% of those who drank one to six units of alcohol per week developed asthma. In comparison, more than 6% of people who rarely or never drank alcohol began suffering symptoms. Around 4.5% of heavy drinkers who consumed four or more units of alcohol per day became asthmatic. One unit of alcohol is equivalent to half a pint of beer, a single measure of spirits, or just under a standard 125ml glass of wine. See
0
Have your say

KNOWSLEY is one of only six areas in the north west to have reduced its alcohol-related hospital admission rate, according to figures released last week.

It’s the first time the borough has seen a drop in alcohol-related hospital admissions since 2002.

Last year there was a 12 per cent increase in the number of admissions for alcohol-related conditions across Britain.

But, thanks to a series of initiatives, Knowsley was one of only six out of 39 local authorities in the region to buck that trend.

Sue Drew, Knowsley’s director of public health, said: “These new figures reflect the improvements we are continuing to make in the borough to reduce the impact of alcohol and promote sensible drinking.

“Frontline staff are now able to identify those drinking at increasingly harmful levels and can offer support and advice to help modify their drinking to prevent it causing health problems in the future.

“This training can reduce consumption by 20 per cent in higher risk drinkers.”

She added: “Knowsley also offers the ASK service (Alcohol Service Knowsley) which provides support and treatment at a range of clinics throughout the borough. Whether you are referred by your GP or would just like to seek advice, the clinics offer a wide range of services including family support, relapse prevention, one to one advice and comprehensive alcohol assessments.”

For more information about the range of services available, go online at: www.knowsley.nhs.uk